C4 is offering a series of ongoing webinars where you will learn best practices and hone your skills in the behavioral health field.

Help with Search courses

The Laws of Family Process

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

Family of Origin experiences follow certain laws of family process. Just as an imbalance in the laws of nature can cause a catastrophic natural disaster, an imbalance in the laws of family process can cause catastrophic dysfunction in the individual psyche. This presentation will describe the Laws of Family Process and explain how to recover from the impact of family of origin dysfunction.

How Professionals Can Utilize a Model of Resilience to Help Clients Stay Sober, and Even Thrive During This Crisis

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

This webinar will give participants a model and approach to help clients develop resilience to handle the current global crisis. The approach, based on Dr. Sideroff’s book, “The Path: Mastering the Nine Pillars of Resilience and Success” presents a cognitive, emotional, physical and spiritual model of resilience that can be used to create a constructive framework to help clients cope with the current personal and global crisis. Stress is one of the most critical issues creating vulnerability to relapse. It strains one’s ability to cope, leading to emotional reactivity and makes new learning less accessible. This program will give participants a path to follow based on his comprehensive approach.

How Professionals Can Be Resilient and Manage the Stresses of the Present Crisis – a Nine Step Approach and Model of Resilience

This course awards 1 CE Hours. 

The global pandemic highlights a fundamental relationship in addiction and recovery: Stress strains one’s ability to cope and affects physical, emotional and cognitive functioning. It is a major factor in vulnerability to relapse. This crisis, however, is more than just stress; it is also loss of life, loss of work, and life changing pain and uncertainty. Professionals need a strategy to deal with their own stress and response to this crisis, so that they can be resilient. From this place of personal competence, they can better address these issues with clients. This webinar presents a nine-step approach to resilience during the Coronavirus crisis.

Supporting Grief Work in Recovery

This course awards 1.5 CE Hours. 

Loss, mourning, and grief are an integral and unavoidable experience in human life. Substance use, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and physical and mental illness greatly increase the risk of unexpected, tragic, and traumatic losses, motivate behaviors to numb pain and distress, and multiply challenges to engaging in the important “work” of grieving. Stigma of substance use and guilt and shame, associated with accidental deaths from overdose and suicide, further complicate bereavement and loss in both active addiction and recovery. This workshop will review theories of bereavement and grief and explore practices for supporting recovery in bereaved people, whose grieving and recovery is complicated and compromised by addiction and depression.

Integrative Therapies as Powerful Adjuncts in Substance Abuse Treatment

This course awards 1 CE Hours. 

This presentation will give an overview of Integrative Health Modalities (previously referred to as complementary medicine or alternative therapies) as defined by the National Institute of Health and identify which are used for specific stages of treatment and recovery (detox, post-acute withdrawal, early and long term recovery). Acupuncture and homeopathy will be explored in greater depth using pre- and post-treatment videos. All presented work will be accompanied by extensive research bibliography.

Trauma Integrated Addiction Treatment: What Is It? What Should It Look Like?

This course awards 1.5 CE Hours. 

No matter who you speak to in the addiction treatment world, they will tell you that they do trauma informed or trauma integrated treatment. But what does that mean and what should that look like? This presentation will offer a developmental model and a set of axioms that can be utilized in the development of effective trauma integrated treatment. The Neuro Affective Relational Model (NARM) will be proposed as a central organizing theory for assisting clients to work simultaneously with achievement of addiction milestones and resolution of day-to-day trauma symptoms. NARM is a treatment model designed to address developmental trauma, based on somatic psychotherapy, attachment theory and regulation of the autonomic nervous system. NARM developmental themes of connection to self and others, attunement to needs, trusting self and others, autonomy and boundary setting, and the ability for love/sexuality will be highlighted.

The Challenges of Couples Therapy for Addiction: CRAFTing Attachment

This course awards 1.5 CE Hours. 

Substance use imposes a threat to couples’ relationships likened to the betrayal of an affair. Resentment and hurt can build for both parties, worsen the addiction and doom a relationship. Connection, support and the reduction of stress are crucial for recovery but enabling can prolong the use. How should therapists navigate these complex issues? The past stance of postponing therapy until abstinence is attained leaves couples discouraged, in pain, and feeling alone and hopeless, all factors that could precipitate or increase substance use. This is wrong and inadequate and wastes an important, sometimes the most important, reason to change. We will introduce CRAFT (Community Reinforcement Approach – Family Therapy) and EFT (Emotionally Focused Therapy) and show how and when to use each to maximize successful engagement, motivation and recovery of the addicted person and their partner.

An Integrative Harm Reduction Therapy Approach to Addictions

This course awards 1.5 CE Hours. 

This presentation will speak to the national opioid crisis and how the United States government is reacting to the devastation of opioid abuse, opioid diversion, and overdose deaths in the context of in-depth look at current legislative activity as well as an assessment of what is to be expected.

The Role of Spirituality in Promoting Recovery

This course awards 1 CE Hours. 

This presentation will speak to the national opioid crisis and how the United States government is reacting to the devastation of opioid abuse, opioid diversion, and overdose deaths in the context of in-depth look at current legislative activity as well as an assessment of what is to be expected.

Recovery from Alcohol and Other Drug Problems in a Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Adults

This course awards 1.25 CE Hours. 

Alcohol and other drug (AOD) misuse and related disorders confer a prodigious burden of disease, disability and premature mortality in middle and high-income countries globally. Understanding how individuals are successful at changing and sustaining salutary change with regard to AOD-related behaviors has become a clinical and public health priority in light of increases in alcohol and opioid harms and a rapidly changing policy landscape regarding the legal status of marijuana. This talk examines these global challenges with presentation of results from the first nationally representative study of US adults who have successfully resolved a significant AOD problem highlighting national recovery prevalence estimates, the variety of recovery pathways used, recovery identity, number of prior recovery attempts needed to resolve an AOD problem, and changes in indices of quality of life and functioning with time in recovery.

Contemporary Principles of Addiction Treatment

This course awards 1 CE Hours. 

This presentation/workshop details in part the research by Ann Fletcher, the author if “Inside Rehab,” on the addictions treatment field. It describes the 12 core principles of excellent contemporary addictions treatment. Skills reviewed will include: conducting outcomes assessments, implementing feedback-informed treatment, Streamlining a comprehensive assessment process, creating a safe milieu, crafting a patient-centered approach, managing the paradox of surrender and empowerment, integrating recovery-based and discovery-based approaches, nurturing total recovery, implementing a system for comprehensive assessment and treatment, facilitating recovery supports, Interlacing services within a larger human service matrix, implementing evidence-based treatments, and creating long-term services and supports.

The United States of Opioids: A Prescription for Liberating a Nation in Pain

This course awards 1.25 CE Hours. 

This presentation will speak to the national opioid crisis and how the United States government is reacting to the devastation of opioid abuse, opioid diversion, and overdose deaths in the context of in-depth look at current legislative activity as well as an assessment of what is to be expected.

8 Ways to Wellbeing for Recovering People

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLCs) identified in “8 Ways to Wellbeing for Recovering People,” are an underutilized, but profoundly effective treatment for optimizing mental health and supporting recovery from most psychiatric issues, such as addiction, anxiety, depression, eating disorders and trauma. In addition, they are an effective intervention for relapse prevention. Based on the exhaustive research of Roger Walsh, M.D., Ph.D. at the University of CA at Irvine, these TLCs described and amplified in this workshop, can serve as core curriculum for inpatient or outpatient programs, as well as individual use. Why “lifestyle changes?” Because research shows that TLCs, such as changing ones diet, getting regular exercise, relaxation, healthy recreation, time outdoors in nature, fostering supportive relationships, spiritual practice and service to others can be enormously beneficial for optimizing mental and physical health and wellbeing.TLCs are not the whole answer. Nothing is. They are a proven modality in addiction treatment.

Emerging Digital Health Technologies and Continuing Care

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

Many patients, perhaps the majority, do not engage in standard continuing care although it may be available for them. This creates a strong case for the importance of new continuing care models that can supplement, and in some cases replace, the traditional clinical-based approach. Emerging digital health technologies (DHT’s) show promise for helping both to refine therapies for the client’s individual needs while providing support in settings beyond the clinic. This webinar is designed for treatment personnel who want to consider offering continuing care and support services via the Internet for individual, group, family or alumni completing initial recovery programs. Participants will be introduced to basic ethical practices that will enable them to introduce and implement secure Internet technology into the clinical setting and ongoing care plan.

Adult ADHD, Amphetamne, Addiction, and the Amygdala

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

ADHD and addiction commonly co-occur and each condition affects the course of the other. There is strong evidence for benefit of stimulant medication in treatment of adult ADHD, but frustratingly, these benefits don’t translate well to their use in early recovery. In this presentation, we will consider the evidence for approaches to ADHD in the addiction treatment setting, look at the latest evidence on the nature of adult ADHD, and examine the overlap between childhood trauma and ADHD, including how both conditions are mediated through the amygdala, and the implications of this connection in developing treatment strategies.

The Wounded Healer: Helping the Helper

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

Burnout, compassion fatigue, and vicarious trauma are landmines in the field of addiction. Many of us struggle with work demands, familial expectations, not to mention the desire for a fulfilling personal life. Our supervisors repeat the mantra, “don’t forget your self care!” But who has the energy to schedule a massage or even run a bubble bath after a stressful day? In order to thrive in this field, it’s crucial we shine a light on what really matters when it comes to caring for ourselves and the barriers that get in the way of being our best selves. This experiential workshop will differentially define burnout, compassion fatigue, and vicarious trauma; provide a deep understanding of self-compassion (and what gets in the way); and support participants in evaluating crucial components of their individual self-care plan to support the healthiest version of themselves.

Trauma, Shame, and Addiction – How did we get here…and how do we change?

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

As the opioid epidemic continues to unfold on the American landscape, our society is experiencing the loss of the flower of a generation. Studies reveals that alcohol use remains an even larger and growing public health problem than opioids. Marijuana use has become so casual as to usher itself into mainstream America, an innocuous choice for some perhaps, but for many others including the youngest amongst us its effects are devastating. Addiction is now a public health concern of epic proportions.

What about the undercurrents to addiction, the things that frequently start addiction, that fuel addiction? What about the undertreated public health menace that directly impacts and precedes addiction, and negatively affects the health and longevity of individuals and families? This silent menace is trauma, especially trauma from childhood. Learn to recognize that untreated trauma leads to the failure of so many individuals who find themselves chronically relapsing into the spiral of opioid addiction, alcoholism, gambling and sex addiction.

Beyond Trauma-Informed Care: The MET(T)A Protocol

This course awards 1.25 CE Hours. 

The mental health treatment field has made great strides in recognizing the role that trauma plays in presenting problems and disorders by providing trauma-informed care. However, considering the widespread impact that trauma has on survivors, simply realizing this impact, recognizing the symptoms of trauma, and responding to them is not enough to heal the damage done. The disorders that can manifest from surviving a trauma, such as PTSD, major depressive disorder, substance use disorders, and eating disorders, the risky behaviors that trauma triggers such as self-injurious behaviors, promiscuity, isolation, etc., and the life-changing decisions that result from it such as suicide, speaks for the need for the vital move from trauma-informed care to trauma-focused care that the mental health field must make in order to ethically and effectively treat trauma.

Trauma-focused care assumes that unhealed trauma plays a major role in presenting issues, denotes greater action in the delivery of treatment services, and promotes proactive treatment planning to heal the legacy of trauma. The MET(T)A (Mindfulness and EMDR Treatment Template for Agencies) Protocol provides the trauma-focused solution that survivors of trauma need to find long-lasting recovery. The MET(T)A Protocol is a new and innovative way to envision and implement agency mental health treatment that is grounded in the over 30 years of research, theory, and practice of EMDR therapy, as well as the 2600 years of research theory and practice of the Buddhist psychology of Mindfulness. It honors the current belief that there is a deep need for trauma resolution to be a key focus of treatment to strengthen relapse prevention and create sustainable long-term recovery.

This webinar will make the case for the move from trauma-informed care to trauma-focused care by applying EMDR therapy as a complete psychotherapy instead of as a technique or approach, with mindfulness as a stabilizing anchor for treatment effects and Buddhist psychology as a philosophical system to treat mental health disorders.


How Advances in HIT, Devices, Sensors and Wearables are Improving Behavioral Healthcare

This course awards 1 CE Hour. 

This panel session will focus on how advancing technology is enabling innovation and improvement in behavioral health and recovery especially around the value of data and analytics, interoperability and clinical decision support. Sensor improvement, wearable technology, and virtual reality is advancing and removing barriers to care and facilitating connection among patients, clinicians and care managers. These evolving capabilities are driving better outcomes, powerful analytics, and personalization of care essential for value-based care. Technology focused on in this panel will include data sharing, sensors/wearables, assessments, analytics/ML, and other patient and clinical workflow tools. Attending this session will give the clinician and the program leadership new information about current and new tools to improve efficacy, outcomes, and quality of care and recovery support.